Allan Parker's Publications

Excerpt from Chapter 3 of
The Negotiator's Toolkit by Allan Parker

The Ten Magical Tools

What makes them magical?

As mentioned in the introduction I want to give you ten fundamental skills and attitudes which I'll refer to as tools. These will create a magical array of possibilities when you negotiate and I suggest that if you carry out all ten tools, the success rate of your interactions, both personal and professional, will improve quite rapidly and noticeably.

The tools of a good negotiator are:

  1. Listening
  2. Questioning
  3. Setting the Appropriate Perceptual Filters
  4. Understanding Logical Levels
  5. Relationship Building and Rapport
  6. Planning, Doing and Reviewing
  7. Setting Frames and Structures
  8. Getting Your Thinking Ready
  9. Handling Emotional States
  10. Pulling It All Together

While none of the ten tools that I suggest may be a surprise to you, the ingredient that will make them work very effectively and create the magic, will be if you have all ten in place during your negotiation.

Once you have all ten tools and an understanding in some depth of each, every time you finish a negotiation, you can go back and look at how well they worked. Invariably the times when they worked well, will be when all ten were present. The times when the negotiation didn't work as well as you would have liked, was when you forgot to include one or two of them. It is the combination of these tools that creates the magic and the success. Not any one of them.

The second thing that will make these tools work and be effective, is your ability to implement them as an artisan, rather than as a technician. Many of you would have had the experience of being a victim to somebody else's learned tools. Chances are these tools came out seeming contrived and, in some instances, manipulative.

When somebody uses a tool simply as a tool, it can seem somewhat clumsy or awkward or contrived. This obviously is something you will want to avoid. I have a suggestion that will allow you to ensure that there is less likelihood that this happens.

To bring the artisan into play I recommend you implement the tools I give you and use them within the framework outlined (in the book).

Read other excerpts from The Negotiator's Toolkit: Negotiation Styles